Halloween Party Ideas from the 1920's

by HalloweenDiva
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halloween-pranks-1920

Hallowe’en is a splendid time for giving a party. In ancient times huge bonfires were built on the top of hills to proclaim that mystic and sacred rites were being performed by which to ward off evil spirits that were supposed to be on mischief bent on this day. So why not have an outdoor fete with a picnic supper cooked over the coals? A bonfire with fagots (a bundle of sticks, twigs, or branches bound together and used as fuel, a fascine, a torch, etc.) for each to burn during the telling of a ghost story would be one rite to be performed. If this is not practical, the idea could be carried out around an open fireplace nerves a gas log its an apartment.

Of course, Jack o’Lanterns are the decoration most appropriate, and made of real pumpkins they are a never failing delight. If the real article is too costly, very good substitutes rnay be found at the favor counter. Candles make the best light and are a very attractive feature placed on mantels, bookcases and wherever they will stand. Vegetable candlesticks should be used. Carrot, turnips, potatoes and tiny squash lend themselves for this purpose and make delightful spots of color. The guests may pop corn, or large bowls filled with it ready popped may be placed on tables conveniently placed, with baskets of apples and chestnuts for roasting. For a party consisting of just twelve guests one hostess prepared twelve little sacks of yellow satin tied with black ribbon, since yellow and black have long been the favorite colors for Hallowe’en.

…yellow and black have long been the favorite colors for Hallowe’en.

Inside each bag was a strip of paper bearing an individual charm for each guest. They were told that the bags had been blessed by Titania, queen of the fairies, and her blessing would serve to keep off the witches for a year. I am printing these charmed talismans for you as they may be written and concealed in a mystery cake if you wish to use them that way:

  • “Keep this charm next your heart; it will bring you a friend in need.”
  • “This charm in your right shoe morn, will help your troubles to be borne.”
  • “Kept in your left-hand pocket, this charm will bring surprises.”
  • ‘”Hidden in your favorite book, pleasant memories around will look.”
  • “Gaze on this charm in the morning, it will bring you much adoring.”
  • “Worn in your glove this token, will bring words kindly spoken.”
  • “Toss this charm around you three times, it will ensure good luck.”
  • “This charm held to your eyes, will reveal only sunny skies.”
  • “Seven nights held to your ears, ’twill insure you length of years.”
  • “Placed on the back of your left hand, ’twill summon all the fairy band.”
  • “Bind this charm on the first oak you see, and you will happily wedded be.”
  • “Carry this charm in your purse and it will never be empty.”

That everybody who attends a Hallowe’en party should be en masque goes almost without saying. While the art of applying colors to the face to form subtle lines of light and shade or to disguise the features by bringing out this characteristic or lessening that is known and practiced by some, others prefer quicker and less troublesome methods of keeping their identity a secret. For these the knocked-out tooth and the putty nose offer the easiest way out.

“Knocking out” one or more teeth, as the process is technically known, is very easy indeed. Black court-plaster is cut to a size to cover the tooth to be removed, applied—and the trick is done. Plastic putty may be used to  build out the nose and false lashes may be bought and fastened on to change the look of the eyes.

Crepe paper can be used as the basis for a large number of costumes, such as the rose, carrot, butterfly, Jack Frost, gypsies, colonial girl, patriotic characters and various animals or flowers. The crepe paper can be obtained at slight expense in all colors and can be used with any pattern made for cloth; special patterns for crepe-paper costumes can also be obtained, with full directions and with suggestions for color combinations.

 

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