Chrysanthemum Costume

Flower Crepe Paper Costume
Chrysanthimum Crepe Paper Costume

materials needed (16 year old size):

4 Folds Crepe Paper color selected
2 Folds No. 45 Moss Green Crepe Paper
1/2 Doz. No.7 Wire
1 Spool No. 2 Wire

Before making any Crepe Paper Costumes you may want to read the Basic Instructions for Making Crepe Paper Costumes.

The skirt is made of rows of pointed petals sewed to Continue reading “Chrysanthemum Costume”

How to Make Crepe Paper Costumes

There are two ways of making crepe paper costumes; the dress made over a cloth foundation, to which the paper is sewed or pasted, and the “slip-over” model that is made apron style and worn over the regular frock. Complete instructions for making “slip-over costumes” can be found by clicking here.

A muslin slip that fits the person and slips over the head or buttons in the back is the most satisfactory to use. Sometimes a slip that fastens in front can be buttoned up and then the back cut open. When this is done, turn the paper well over the edges and paste down neatly. Instead of using the hooks or buttons, sew narrow ribbons on both sides and tie. Sometimes  snap fasteners, that can be purchased on tape,can be used to good advantage.When costumes are to be made of fringe it is desirable to have the slip the same color as the fringe. A white slip can be easily colored with soap dye.

Slips do not often have sleeves or are they required. If sleeves are needed they may be cut from muslin or net and sewed in the slip before or after being covered with crepe paper. When sewing in crepe paper sleeves always reinforce with a double fold of crepe paper around the armhole. Regular dress patterns may be used for cutting waists and sleeves but they are not often required.

Crepe paper may be sewed on the sewing machine or by hand. When sewing by hand, use silkateen or other soft finish thread and have the stitches quite long and not very near the edge. The sewing machine can be used to good advan­tage for sewing two widths of crepe paper together, gathering ruffles, stitching up seams and sewing on bands. It is not always necessary to gather the paper with needle and thread, especially when making hats; the paper can be gathered up in the fingers and a wire twisted around to hold the paper in place.

Always make the skirt first; as the paper is only 20 inches wide, and to hang well the paper must be used with the grain of the crepe running up and down, often two widths may be sewed or pasted together. When joining two widths, lap one flat over the other about half an inch and stitch on the sewing machine or paste. If possible make the piecing come on the lower part of the skirt.

Instead of fastening two widths together, two or more ruffles are often used. Sew the Slip for Crepe Paper Costumelower one in place first (illustra­tion No.1). The others should be sewed on so that the lower edge will be at least 3 inches below the gathers of the lower ruffle. The bottom ruffle should extend at least 3 inches be­ low the bottom of the slip.

In most cases, the waist should be slightly full and sewed to the foundation at the waist line and around the neck. Measure a full width strip of crepe paper about thes houlders loosely. Add from 10 to 20 inches for fullness. Start at the back at the waistline and gather in the fullness, fastening with pins so that any necessary alterations may be made easily. Draw up the material and pin in place around the neck and armholes. Cut the paper off, turn in if necessary and sew in place. For a neat finish at neck and armholes, allow the paper to extend about an inch beyond the foundation, slash about one inch apart, then turn the edge over and paste on the wrong side of the foundation.

It will not be necessary to turn in raw edges and no hems need be made, but often the edges are turned up, creased sharply and fluted.

How to Make Slip-Over Costumes of Crepe Paper

Slip Over CostumeA Slip-Over Costume is what its name implies and is worn over any simple frock. It does not require a muslin foundation; all that is needed for the founda­tion is a straight strip of crepe paper, long enough to reach from the neck, front and back, to the waist line or below. It may be made the correct width either by cutting as shown by the dotted lines in illustration No.1, or one or two tucks may be made as shown in illustration No. 2. An oval or oblong piece is cut out for the neck.

To this foundation ruffles, fringe or flower petals are sewed or pasted. The front and back are usually just alike. Narrow ribbons are sewed on each side, front and back, atthe waist line to hold the costume in place. A slip-over and cap to match, made from one fold of crepe paper, are shown below. Continue reading “How to Make Slip-Over Costumes of Crepe Paper”

1930 Dennison Halloween Parties Magazine

Vintage Dennison Halloween Parties Magazines 1930
Vintage Dennison Halloween Parties Magazines 1930

I scanned the Dennison Halloween Parties Magazine from 1930 and made a quick video of it.

As of 9/12/10, I have put this particular Vintage Halloween magazine up for sale on eBay.

Enjoy the video:

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Dennison Halloween Decorations from 1929

The above picture shows Dennison Halloween decorations that were available around 1929.

A ghost may stand guard at the doorway. Its head is a Cardboard Cut-out H651 and its body crepe paper cut into fine fringe.

Cardboard cats, owls, ghosts and owls (Cut­ outs H646, H645, H652 and H551) can be used to advantage on the walls.

Here are some vintage Dennison Halloween decorations available on ebay:

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Paper Bag Halloween Mask (1920's)

Paperbag Halloween MasksMake Halloween Masks from Paper Bags http://vintageinfo.net/paper-bag-halloween-mask/Paper bag Halloween masks are worn over the head, covering the face completely.  Holes are cut for the eyes and mouth.

The back of
the bag should be cut to fit over the shoulders.

For safest fit – use brown paper grocery bags.

Skull Paper Bag Mask

A ghost face made by adding ears of folded white crepe paper.  The features are drawn on with crayon.

You can use Halloween Decorations for the face on your Paper Bag Halloween Masks.

Hootin' Halloween Party Idea (1920's)

Shall we have a party for Halloween? That is no question in the average school. It is a foregone conclu­sion. The one and only problem left is: “Just what kind of party shall we have?” Let us suggest a party for all the wise owls of the rising generation. The invitations might read as follows: Continue reading “Hootin' Halloween Party Idea (1920's)”